Sunday, February 9, 2020

The events industry Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

The events industry - Essay Example For instance, in the current world, the amount for raising and sponsoring events is quite higher compared to the way it was several decades ago. As such, it is important to note that the event industry has been undergoing a dramatic change relevant to several issues touching on demands and interests of the organizers and the intended participants. For instance, in the past days, the costs for conducting such events involving local sports were relatively low (Smith, 2009, 53). This involved people coming, watching games and moving back to their residences. However, currently the costs of such local events have increased tremendously. The local events nowadays employ the use of public address systems as well as media involvements. These contribute towards raising the costs of such events. Events may always originate from different sources involving festivals, public events as well as cultures and traditions (Fenich, 2012, 36). However, it is important to note that events differ in their characteristics. Some events are labor intensive whereas others are perishable. Fixed time scales, uniqueness as well as personal interactions always characterize events. However, it is important to acknowledge the fact that the event industry has been critical in ensuring economic development and growth, societal development as well as conservation of cultures (Baum, 2009, 51). There are several categories and typologies of events. Events can be categorized into six main categories. These include the individual events, group events, organizational as well as multi-organizational events. In addition, other categories may include national events as well as international events. Several typologies of events exist relevant to the different categories. Individual events may comprise of weddings, birthday parties as well as private dinners (Goldblatt, 2011, 53). Group events may involve festivals as well as local

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger Essay Example for Free

Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger Essay In The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, the author takes us on a journey with Holden Caulfield, a sixteen-year-old boy, going in and out of many boarding schools. When he gets kicked out of Pencey the story begins. In fear of coming home to his parents, Holden takes a trip to New York; which leaves him at the point of mental, physical, and emotional insanity. As the novel goes on his obsession with keeping children from losing their purity grows. The adult world seems fake, and Holden does not respect people who made the transition. In Gerald Rosen’s â€Å"A Retrospective Look At The Catcher In The Rye† he explores Holden’s connection to other characters in the book. He also analyzes the difficulties in crossing over to the adult world. Holden qualms the crossing over due to the fact that losing one’s innocence will force one to face reality, and will at times cause adults to â€Å"fall† into a deeper hole. Holden’s mania of keeping children from transitioning to adult hood shows all throughout The Catcher in the Rye. Rosen explains that during the period of time Holden was in the museum he made it known that everything always stayed the same. The purpose of the â€Å"glass cases† acts as a defense against touching, or tainting. â€Å"Like the children in the museum, to protect the innocent, the catcher must strictly refrain from touching; he must ‘just leave them alone’’’ (Rosen). This moment in the book compares the protected artifacts to the innocence of a child. He feels that if the children had someone to protect them from getting affected (â€Å"touched†) by the hard and cruel times in life they could hold onto their purity for as long as possible. Holden expresses the fact that he wants ensure security and stability during these times in life. This point seems to be the first point in the novel where Holden shows a desire to keep children from corruption. â€Å"Anyway, I keep picturing all these kids playing some game in the big field of rye and allWhat I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start going over the cliff† (Salinger 173). Holden wants to â€Å"catch† the kids from their transition into an adult. He does not want them having to deal with losses they will have to overcome in life. He believes that going into adulthood marks the point where society shows its true face. Since Allie, Holden brother’s, death he sees how reality twists and warps in sick ways. While walking around the museum he sees profanity. â€Å"I went down by a different staircase, and I saw another ‘Fuck You’ on the wall. I tried to rub it off with my hand again, but this one was scratched on, with a knife or something. It wouldn’t come off. It’s hopeless, anyway. If you had a million years to do it in, you couldn’t rub out even half of the ‘Fuck You’ signs in the world. It’s impossible† (Salinger 173).When Holden see those words written on the wall he realizes that the youth has already gone through exposure to corruption and cannot go backwards. Holden now understands his inability to save the children from â€Å"falling†, growing up. Since Holden has spent most of his time refraining other from going into adulthood, he did not see how much he himself has fallen. Holden has many similar qualities to a former classmate, James Castle. â€Å"Holden is identified with Castle by Castle’s having killed himself while wearing Holden’s sweater and by Castle’s appearing just before Holden on the roll call and school. This carries the implication that Holden maybe next in line for Castle’s death† (Rosen). James Castle’s way of and to death influenced Holden’s view of life. He suddenly became ostracized in society surrounded by a bunch of â€Å"phonies†. Death was the start and end of Holden’s loss of innocence. Holden never truly had an adult figure in life. His parents detached themselves from him, in times of his need. Feeling like he needed to communicate with someone he called his former teacher, Mr. Antolini. Holden wants to catch children from falling, where as Mr. Antolini wants to save Holden from a rough way down. â€Å"I have a feeling that you’re falling, a terrible,terrible fall† (Salinger 186).Mr. Antolini says this because ever since Allie’s death Holden has had a series of falls. Even though Allie was younger than Holden, he idolized him and thinks very highly of him. Mr. Antolini symbolizes Holden’s loss of Allie, loneliness, and inability to posess self-esteem. Holden wants to provide insurance for children so they do not experience the reality of society and from â€Å"falling† into a deeper hole. Making sure he succeeds, he does everything to keep them from going over the edge. Holden grows up through the novel, and realized that losing one’s innocence in is an unavoidable part of life. In this stage of life one makes the most mistakes and learns from them. If one never went through experience necessary to grow into an adult, they would seem very naà ¯ve and easily taken advantage of. People that have gone through the difficult crossing over want to protect children from the hard-ships. Works Cited Rosen, Gerald. â€Å"A Retrospective Look At The Catcher In The Rye.† American Quarterly 457-462 Salinger, J.D. The Catcher in the Rye. Boston: Little, Brown, 1951.

Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Drugs: How Danagerous Is It? Essay -- essays research papers

Drugs: How Danagerous Is It? Drugs have infiltrated our cities, our towns and our lives. Though a small percentage of people use drugs, they do attempt to spread their plague among others. But, how dangerous are these mind suppressors? Do they kill like the statistics show, or is it a coverup to stop people from having a good time? Even in Franklin County, there are drugs. How bad is the problem? It is worse then most people think, but what can we do about it? Can we do anything about it? Marijuana is the drug of choice among most addicts. It is provided cheap and is easily available. Overdosing it on this drug is not possible, or at least dying of an overdose, thus making it seem safe. The high is described as a rush of calmness and relaxation. People under the influence feel relaxed and as if their problems are gone. The most common method of doing this drug is smoking it. The leafy plant is dried and smoked in a joint, or a rolled cigarette with a paper mouth piece. It can also be smoked in a bong, or pipe. Another method is eating the leaves of the plant. They must be cooked in some sort of fat. Marijuana is fat soluble, and for the reason, must be cooked in butter, lard, milk, or other substance. A new method is being tested. It includes "baking" the marijuana under a flame without burning it. It is nearly the same as smoking it, but there is no smoke, which may limit the chance of lung cancer. Yet is this drug safe? No. The short term effects, besides the calmness are the following: temporary memory loss, rapid heart beat, and dizziness. The long term effects include the following: Lung cancer, heart problems, and immune system disorders. The equivalent of one joint is four cigarettes, or ten seconds of car exhaust. No one sees the dangers of this drug, and they usually do not care about them, making it even more dangerous. LSD, or acid, is a synthetic drug that was originally found on the skin of a mushroom. This is considered a psychedelic drug. It is very cheap, usually $4 - $5 a trip. A trip usually consists of 500-600 "mics" of acid. It can be made from morning glory, wood petroleum and other chemicals. The high is very interesting. It is described as non-real. It brings reality and imagination together in a utopia of relaxation. This may sound good, but people tripping on acid do not realized what they are doing and could j... .... This drug is by far the most dangerous of the popular drugs. They often link it to violence and gangs. The drug problem in Franklin County isn't as large as in cities, but is existent. People use drugs, mainly because of peer pressure. Most people would not agree with this, but it is true. Ignorance is a major player in the drug problem. People don't realize HOW dangerous it is. If all people understood the information in this report, the problem could go decrease. It was stated that if marijuana was legalized, the drug problem would cease. This does have some truth to it, but most people say that marijuana leads to other drugs, but studies show that approximately 5% of people who try marijuana try other drugs. Marijuana does not lead to other drugs. However, this does not nullify the fact that marijuana kills people. It does it with the same potency of cigarettes. This is due to the fact that people do not smoke 40 joints a day, like some cigarette smokers, they smoke about two joints a week. But, there is not excuse for other "hard drugs" like LSD, heroin and cocaine. People need to learn what they are doing to themselves; that is the key to solving the drug problem.

Monday, January 13, 2020

King Lear

Although a similar vision of justice is encompassed within King Lear and The Tempest, both protagonists receive fate strikingly dissimilar from one another; as a direct result of the relationship shared between their respective daughters, which ultimately distinguishes the plays from the similar concepts (compassion, nature, monarchy, and usurping) found within them. In King Lear, the nature of mercy and redemption are unobtainable elements, as the form of a Shakespearean tragedy is established on the foundation of chaos and pity, which arguably conceals the subtle (or blatant) relationship between both plays.Both plays include a tempest; a violent thunderstorm that symbolize a life-changing moment for the introspective protagonists. Prospered magic conjures the violent storm described in The Tempest, which destroys the boat of his royal enemies and prompts the pilot of the play. Unlike Prosper, Lear is a victim of the tempest described in his tragedy, but Shakespeare purposely uses this scene to ‘ cleanse' the drenched king as he makes a revelation through an emotional soliloquy, thus humbugging him.This concept of nature's fury, although mutually significant in both respective plays, also discloses the dissimilarity shared between the two protagonists. Prosper, from the opening scene, was described as wise and empathetic, specifically using the storm to confront his enemies, not to cause harm. Prosper was already introduced to the audience as a humankind protagonist, while Shakespeare depicted Lear as ‘blind' until his own tempest in the middle of the play. The significance of the tempest scenes symbolizes the genesis of repentance and retribution for both of the principal characters.Although Prosper is successful in restoring his role as the rightful king in the plays climax, Learner's kingdom is obliterated and results in his death. The notable nature behind the protagonist's paternal role towards their daughter tryingly influences the events of the play, as both elderly kings are fathers to similarly angelic daughters. In King Lear, the audience is quickly clued in on Learner's foolishness as a father, since Shakespeare manifests this notion through the old kings retirement celebration.Learner's two daughters, General and Reagan, are wicked women who manipulatively express their faux affection towards their narcissistic father. Ironically, Cornelia remains the only daughter of virtue who proclaims that the sincere affection she feels towards him transcends mere words. King Learner's opening CT alone already corresponds with the introduction found within The Tempest's introduction, except the scenario is presented in a reverse manner.Lear was seeking an early retirement and attempted to distribute his kingdom between his three daughters, while Prosper was usurped of his dukedom by his treacherous younger brother, Antonio. Despite of the similarities presented in the opening act, Shakespeare also reveals the pivotal differe nce behind the plays father/daughter dynamic. Unlike Lear, Prosper is completely engrossed in Miranda and her well- being from the plays opening, even comparing her too cherub: MIRANDA Alack, what trouble Was I then to you! PROSPER O, a cherubim Thou waste that did preserve me.Thou didst smile. Infused with a fortitude from heaven. (1. 2. 51-54) Shakespeare arguably uses Miranda for the sole purpose of symbolism, since her character's actions are essentially irrelevant to the events in The Tempest, as she's utilized more as an image of Prospered fatherly love rather than a character of great significance. Cornelia, whose nature is undeniably similar to Miranda, is portrayed as one the most compelling characters in King Lear, due to her role as the angelic daughter who substitutes Marinara's naivety with awareness.Shakespeare exchanges the protagonist's role through their daughters in both King Lear and The Tempest; Lear exhibits Marinara's naivety and Prosper reflects Cordillera's c ompassion. Shakespeare distinguishes this concept from the onset of both plays and hints towards the protagonist's fate through, once again, their daughters. Prosper established his endearment towards Miranda in the beginning of The Tempest and consistently demonstrated his loyalty towards her. Shakespeare rewards the unconditional love exhibited by the elderly king and compensates the former ruler with a favorable conclusion.In King Lear, the protagonist is not bestowed with the same fortune, as Lear also hints towards his fate during the plays introduction. Lear does not refer to his celestial daughter a cherub, like Prosper did, and chooses to disown his daughter instead: LEAR: Let it be so. Thy truth then be thy dower. For by the sacred radiance of the sun, The mysteries of Hectare and the night, By all the operation of the orbs From whom we do exist and cease to be-? Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity, and property of blood, And as a stranger to my heart and me H old thee from this for ever.The barbarous Scythian, Or he that makes his generation messes To gorge his appetite, shall to my bosom Be as well neighborhood, pitied, and relieved As thou my sometime daughter. (109-123) Truthfully, Lear only disowned his daughter through the sole notion that she didn't love him (verbally), but the motive behind this harsh act does not exempt Lear from the grim fate Shakespeare had reserved. A Shakespearean tragedy is molded on the tragic figure's hamster, as Learner's foolishness' was evidently his.Betrayal of kin spreads like poison throughout King Learner's conclusion: Gloucester, Lear, Reagan, and General all meet their grim fate because of the deception they inflicted on their families. Cornelia is substantially the most tragic character in King Lear (and arguably all of the tragedies) due to her innocent and compassionate persona, which rejects the bitterness imposed from being the victim of betrayal and attempts to restore her father's usurped t itle.However, the unspeakable act behind a father abandoning his saintly daughter strongly indicates why Shakespeare bestowed Prosper with magic and Lear with madness. Superficially, King Lear and The Tempest both provide many of the elements squired in a revenge plot. Both protagonists are conceptually banished after their royal power is renounced, regardless if the title was robbed from them or relinquished willingly, and desire to restore their former glory. The plays also describe similar scenes of madness experienced by Lear but inflicted by Prosper on secondary characters.Although betrayal and the search for Justice are elements fundamental to the plays plot, neither story qualifies in taking the title of a revenge tragedy. In King Lear, the only character that arguably has a motive for revenge is Edmund for being mocked as an illegitimate child. Lear, the principal character, is responsible for triggering the events of the play by allowing the wicked sisters to rule his kingd om and disown Cornelia. In The Tempest, the magical harpy generated by Prospered magic doesn't qualify as the Vengeful ghost' most revenge tragedies would describe.Prosper succeeds in his revenge by restoring his stolen title from Antonio, but expresses mercy and compassion towards his enemies, therefore voiding the play from any tragic genre. Predominantly, the themes illustrated in The Tempest and King Lear project the once for Justice, but the concept behind familial betrayal stem from the protagonist's daughters and ultimately receive Judgment from Shakespeare. The component of evil is not entirely absent from The Tempest, as Clinical (the son of the Devil who attempted to rape young Miranda) is undeniably a wicked character.Clinical echoes similarities to Lagos character in Othello, evoking the idea that the Devil mightier had more children scattered throughout the Shakespearean universe. While the Journey for restoration described in King Lear arguably parallels the plot thin The Tempest, the progress actually made by protagonists reveals that the psyche of both men are actually years apart. Prosper is already enjoying the relationship he shares with his daughter at the beginning of his play while Lear doesn't make his revelation until half of the plays events elapse.In fact, Lear is ironically more sane as a madman then he ever was as king. Shakespeare gives the notion that the power behind father-daughter relationship transcends any obstacle hurled towards the protagonist, as described by the victory Prosper achieved after Ewing exiled to a distant island, but the tragedy depicted in King Lear reminds the audience of the grim consequences one must face when turning their back on innocent family. The conclusion of both plays, Just like their introductions, are described in a reverse fashion.Shakespeare temporarily forgave Lear through compassionate Cornelia, while Prosper exhibited his compassion by forgiving the other characters. Prosper learns compass ion through Miranda, a concept that Shakespeare deliberately instilled in Lear when it was too late . If Shakespeare had altered the conclusion in King Lear to an ending where Lear survived the chaos, then t would be plausible to assume his character would exhibit the same characteristics of Prosper; two elderly rulers who where once usurped by malicious family and learned the value of compassion through their righteous daughters.Of course, this theoretical concept of King Lear concluding in peace would null the play from its tragic form, and reclassify the drama as a comedy Just like it's companion play, The Tempest. Moreover, The elements of a tragedy illustrated in The Tempest are not as blatant as those described in King Lear, if anything, the hamster Lear suffers from is substituted by Prospered wisdom. The element of hope, however, is a strong tragic component that pulsates throughout the veins of both plays. The audience evidently sympathizes with both protagonists, as both e lderly men have been â€Å"more sinned against than sinning. (3. 2. 1372), but Shakespeare ultimately scrutinizes the elderly men through their behavior as fathers-of-celestial women and Judges their fate by either condemning the protagonist to an agonizing death or rewarding him with the honor of restored monarchy and freedom. *Addendum: If given the fortunate opportunity to celebrate my 65th birthday, Judging by how I fleet on life the past 24 years, I can certainly see myself remembering Shakespearean work as the key to understanding hamster and the very-real danger it can demonstrate.Aristotle coined the term hamster, but it wasn't until I read Shakespearean Hamlet that I realized the consequences of your internal-flaws. Similar to Hamlet, I used to have an indecisive personality, (which hasn't completely faded from my subconscious), and I frequently would think-before acting and find faux justifications in delaying my goals: applying for scholarships, working harder in grade s chool, daily exercise, healthy dieting, and managing finances.Although I didn't interact with the ghost of my father nor seek revenge against my treacherous uncle, I lost dozens of life-enriching opportunities due to being indecisive and it haunts me frequently. I can only assume, and hope, that the age of 65 will be a milestone for decades of utilizing a revamped proactive persona, as the tragedies will always remind me of the catastrophes that stem from personality flaws. After all, what better way can we pity a tragic figure than to express our own compassion towards their suffering? King Lear PPISMP TESL (R) Foundation Course Cohort 4 (June 2011 Intake) English Studies III: PI 1353K (R) (Revision) KING LEAR By William Shakespeare 1. The intricate relationship between characters adds to the interest of readers to study the play. Based on the play you have studied, discuss this statement with convincing evidence to justify your answer. 2. Write a critical analysis of one of the themes presented in the play you have studied. 3. Identify the theme of the play you have studied. Elaborate how the theme is developed by the characters. . Identify the theme of the play you have studied. Elaborate how the plot and the setting develop the theme. 5. Identify one of the issues raised in the play you have studied. characters reflect this issue. Elaborate how the 6. Identify the theme of the play you have studied. Elaborate how the theme is developed by the setting and the characters. 7. Identify the issues raised in the play you have studied. evidence from the text. Discuss the issues with 8. Discuss the significance of the title and how it reflects the theme of the play. .Discuss the significance of the title and how it is developed by the characters and plot of the novel. NHA/ES III – King Lear Revision/2012 Themes Greed for power & wealth Betrayal Familial relationship Love & betrayal Issues Greed for power & wealth destroys Blind love Actions and consequences 10. Based on the drama you have studied, analyze the play based on the following i. The characters ii. The theme iii. The issues raised Support your answer with convincing evidence and elaboration. 1. You have studied a play during this course. Based on this play, write a critical analysis of about 350 words. In your analysis, discuss the themes and issues raised and how these are portrayed by the characters. 12. Write a reader response of about 350 words on the play you have studied. In your reader response, discuss the following; i. ii. iii. The theme The characters and their relationships The i nfluence of the setting on the characters NHA/ES III – King Lear Revision/2012 King Lear Although a similar vision of justice is encompassed within King Lear and The Tempest, both protagonists receive fate strikingly dissimilar from one another; as a direct result of the relationship shared between their respective daughters, which ultimately distinguishes the plays from the similar concepts (compassion, nature, monarchy, and usurping) found within them. In King Lear, the nature of mercy and redemption are unobtainable elements, as the form of a Shakespearean tragedy is established on the foundation of chaos and pity, which arguably conceals the subtle (or blatant) relationship between both plays.Both plays include a tempest; a violent thunderstorm that symbolize a life-changing moment for the introspective protagonists. Prospered magic conjures the violent storm described in The Tempest, which destroys the boat of his royal enemies and prompts the pilot of the play. Unlike Prosper, Lear is a victim of the tempest described in his tragedy, but Shakespeare purposely uses this scene to ‘ cleanse' the drenched king as he makes a revelation through an emotional soliloquy, thus humbugging him.This concept of nature's fury, although mutually significant in both respective plays, also discloses the dissimilarity shared between the two protagonists. Prosper, from the opening scene, was described as wise and empathetic, specifically using the storm to confront his enemies, not to cause harm. Prosper was already introduced to the audience as a humankind protagonist, while Shakespeare depicted Lear as ‘blind' until his own tempest in the middle of the play. The significance of the tempest scenes symbolizes the genesis of repentance and retribution for both of the principal characters.Although Prosper is successful in restoring his role as the rightful king in the plays climax, Learner's kingdom is obliterated and results in his death. The notable nature behind the protagonist's paternal role towards their daughter tryingly influences the events of the play, as both elderly kings are fathers to similarly angelic daughters. In King Lear, the audience is quickly clued in on Learner's foolishness as a father, since Shakespeare manifests this notion through the old kings retirement celebration.Learner's two daughters, General and Reagan, are wicked women who manipulatively express their faux affection towards their narcissistic father. Ironically, Cornelia remains the only daughter of virtue who proclaims that the sincere affection she feels towards him transcends mere words. King Learner's opening CT alone already corresponds with the introduction found within The Tempest's introduction, except the scenario is presented in a reverse manner.Lear was seeking an early retirement and attempted to distribute his kingdom between his three daughters, while Prosper was usurped of his dukedom by his treacherous younger brother, Antonio. Despite of the similarities presented in the opening act, Shakespeare also reveals the pivotal differe nce behind the plays father/daughter dynamic. Unlike Lear, Prosper is completely engrossed in Miranda and her well- being from the plays opening, even comparing her too cherub: MIRANDA Alack, what trouble Was I then to you! PROSPER O, a cherubim Thou waste that did preserve me.Thou didst smile. Infused with a fortitude from heaven. (1. 2. 51-54) Shakespeare arguably uses Miranda for the sole purpose of symbolism, since her character's actions are essentially irrelevant to the events in The Tempest, as she's utilized more as an image of Prospered fatherly love rather than a character of great significance. Cornelia, whose nature is undeniably similar to Miranda, is portrayed as one the most compelling characters in King Lear, due to her role as the angelic daughter who substitutes Marinara's naivety with awareness.Shakespeare exchanges the protagonist's role through their daughters in both King Lear and The Tempest; Lear exhibits Marinara's naivety and Prosper reflects Cordillera's c ompassion. Shakespeare distinguishes this concept from the onset of both plays and hints towards the protagonist's fate through, once again, their daughters. Prosper established his endearment towards Miranda in the beginning of The Tempest and consistently demonstrated his loyalty towards her. Shakespeare rewards the unconditional love exhibited by the elderly king and compensates the former ruler with a favorable conclusion.In King Lear, the protagonist is not bestowed with the same fortune, as Lear also hints towards his fate during the plays introduction. Lear does not refer to his celestial daughter a cherub, like Prosper did, and chooses to disown his daughter instead: LEAR: Let it be so. Thy truth then be thy dower. For by the sacred radiance of the sun, The mysteries of Hectare and the night, By all the operation of the orbs From whom we do exist and cease to be-? Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity, and property of blood, And as a stranger to my heart and me H old thee from this for ever.The barbarous Scythian, Or he that makes his generation messes To gorge his appetite, shall to my bosom Be as well neighborhood, pitied, and relieved As thou my sometime daughter. (109-123) Truthfully, Lear only disowned his daughter through the sole notion that she didn't love him (verbally), but the motive behind this harsh act does not exempt Lear from the grim fate Shakespeare had reserved. A Shakespearean tragedy is molded on the tragic figure's hamster, as Learner's foolishness' was evidently his.Betrayal of kin spreads like poison throughout King Learner's conclusion: Gloucester, Lear, Reagan, and General all meet their grim fate because of the deception they inflicted on their families. Cornelia is substantially the most tragic character in King Lear (and arguably all of the tragedies) due to her innocent and compassionate persona, which rejects the bitterness imposed from being the victim of betrayal and attempts to restore her father's usurped t itle.However, the unspeakable act behind a father abandoning his saintly daughter strongly indicates why Shakespeare bestowed Prosper with magic and Lear with madness. Superficially, King Lear and The Tempest both provide many of the elements squired in a revenge plot. Both protagonists are conceptually banished after their royal power is renounced, regardless if the title was robbed from them or relinquished willingly, and desire to restore their former glory. The plays also describe similar scenes of madness experienced by Lear but inflicted by Prosper on secondary characters.Although betrayal and the search for Justice are elements fundamental to the plays plot, neither story qualifies in taking the title of a revenge tragedy. In King Lear, the only character that arguably has a motive for revenge is Edmund for being mocked as an illegitimate child. Lear, the principal character, is responsible for triggering the events of the play by allowing the wicked sisters to rule his kingd om and disown Cornelia. In The Tempest, the magical harpy generated by Prospered magic doesn't qualify as the Vengeful ghost' most revenge tragedies would describe.Prosper succeeds in his revenge by restoring his stolen title from Antonio, but expresses mercy and compassion towards his enemies, therefore voiding the play from any tragic genre. Predominantly, the themes illustrated in The Tempest and King Lear project the once for Justice, but the concept behind familial betrayal stem from the protagonist's daughters and ultimately receive Judgment from Shakespeare. The component of evil is not entirely absent from The Tempest, as Clinical (the son of the Devil who attempted to rape young Miranda) is undeniably a wicked character.Clinical echoes similarities to Lagos character in Othello, evoking the idea that the Devil mightier had more children scattered throughout the Shakespearean universe. While the Journey for restoration described in King Lear arguably parallels the plot thin The Tempest, the progress actually made by protagonists reveals that the psyche of both men are actually years apart. Prosper is already enjoying the relationship he shares with his daughter at the beginning of his play while Lear doesn't make his revelation until half of the plays events elapse.In fact, Lear is ironically more sane as a madman then he ever was as king. Shakespeare gives the notion that the power behind father-daughter relationship transcends any obstacle hurled towards the protagonist, as described by the victory Prosper achieved after Ewing exiled to a distant island, but the tragedy depicted in King Lear reminds the audience of the grim consequences one must face when turning their back on innocent family. The conclusion of both plays, Just like their introductions, are described in a reverse fashion.Shakespeare temporarily forgave Lear through compassionate Cornelia, while Prosper exhibited his compassion by forgiving the other characters. Prosper learns compass ion through Miranda, a concept that Shakespeare deliberately instilled in Lear when it was too late . If Shakespeare had altered the conclusion in King Lear to an ending where Lear survived the chaos, then t would be plausible to assume his character would exhibit the same characteristics of Prosper; two elderly rulers who where once usurped by malicious family and learned the value of compassion through their righteous daughters.Of course, this theoretical concept of King Lear concluding in peace would null the play from its tragic form, and reclassify the drama as a comedy Just like it's companion play, The Tempest. Moreover, The elements of a tragedy illustrated in The Tempest are not as blatant as those described in King Lear, if anything, the hamster Lear suffers from is substituted by Prospered wisdom. The element of hope, however, is a strong tragic component that pulsates throughout the veins of both plays. The audience evidently sympathizes with both protagonists, as both e lderly men have been â€Å"more sinned against than sinning. (3. 2. 1372), but Shakespeare ultimately scrutinizes the elderly men through their behavior as fathers-of-celestial women and Judges their fate by either condemning the protagonist to an agonizing death or rewarding him with the honor of restored monarchy and freedom. *Addendum: If given the fortunate opportunity to celebrate my 65th birthday, Judging by how I fleet on life the past 24 years, I can certainly see myself remembering Shakespearean work as the key to understanding hamster and the very-real danger it can demonstrate.Aristotle coined the term hamster, but it wasn't until I read Shakespearean Hamlet that I realized the consequences of your internal-flaws. Similar to Hamlet, I used to have an indecisive personality, (which hasn't completely faded from my subconscious), and I frequently would think-before acting and find faux justifications in delaying my goals: applying for scholarships, working harder in grade s chool, daily exercise, healthy dieting, and managing finances.Although I didn't interact with the ghost of my father nor seek revenge against my treacherous uncle, I lost dozens of life-enriching opportunities due to being indecisive and it haunts me frequently. I can only assume, and hope, that the age of 65 will be a milestone for decades of utilizing a revamped proactive persona, as the tragedies will always remind me of the catastrophes that stem from personality flaws. After all, what better way can we pity a tragic figure than to express our own compassion towards their suffering? King Lear The selected passage is from Act IV, Scene VII, from one of the most historical and critically acclaimed plays of William Shakespeare. It is generally agreed today to be Shakespeare's greatest play by the learned as well as the public (Hunter, p. 1). It has the extremes of cruelty and suffering face extremes of loyalty and sacrifice and its basic motifs have the classic themes of love, betrayal, rejection and conquest. Shakespeare’s audience of the time truly understood these themes, identifying well with the king as a tragic hero and the nihilism that was fast growing its seed in the time of Jacobean theater.In the given passage, the scene is presented between Cordelia and her father. A physician is present as well. Cordelia has just rescued her father – who is now battling a profound befuddlement of senses. He is already shifting in and out of reality, wearing flowers in his hair. After these few dialogues of Cordelia (above passage), he comes to consciousness and onc e recognizes Cordelia, begins to believe that they are both dead..King Lear, writes Marvin Rosenberg, was written for the stage, to stimulate sense, feeling, and mind in a massive theatrical experience. Any evaluation must consider the artist's use of all his arousal materials (Rosenberg, p. 1). The emotional turmoil and conflicts of relationships in Lear’s life make much for the ‘massive theatrical experience’ that Shakespeare promised.In this given passage, Cordelia beseeches to her sisters, Regan and Goneril, in dramatic agony. They have betrayed their father and brought him to a condition which brings tears to Cordelia. For the sake of greed and land, the two sisters have brought their father down the very piths of humanity and the one daughter who was actually sincere to Lear is now at his side. Lear, tragically and unfortunately, mistrusted and mistreated this very daughter who was praying unto heavens and doing her utmost to bring her father back to a stat e of life and revival.Seeing her father’s terrible condition, Cordelia wonders out loud, with ample pathos, to Regan and Goneril that if they had not considered the fact that Lear was their father – they could have at least considered his age and senility. But they did not consider it at all and left him to be swallowed by the ill-winds that blew his way with the courtesy of their betrayal itself.Cordelia creates a powerful analogy for the condition of her father and his daughters with the dog of an enemy. She says that even an enemy’s dog, which has the sole purpose of establishing harm to you – would have stood against her or supported her in a terrible fate such as this. But what was this inhumanity of her sisters that they had so deliberately thrown their father into this highly adverse situations where there was no one left to take care of him but the wilderness and the rough fate that brought him to Cordelia in such conditions.The character of Corde lia is a paragon of ‘virtue and optimism'. Her simple nature is signaled by her label-name, which focuses on her situation. She is a woman of heart, compassion and courage (Hamilton, p. 151). When her father asks her to speak of her love and loyalty and devotion to him, she opens Pandora ’s Box by replying in her sweet, simple, precise words, â€Å"Unhappy that I am, I cannot have my heart into my mouth. I love your majesty according to my bond, no more nor less† (Shakespeare, p. 12).   Her father does not understand the depth of these simple and truthful words and mistakes her simplicity for insincerity. He falls in the trap of slick and suave words that ultimately bring his downfall.As she leaves the home, she speaks on her farewell note with the heartfelt emotion, which again goes unnoticed and dishonored, â€Å"The jewels of our father, with wash'd eyes Cordelia leaves you. I know you what you are, and like a sister am most loath to call your faults as the y are nam'd. Love well our father: to your professed bosoms I commit him. But yet, alas, stood I wihin his grace, I would prefer him to a better place. So farewell to you both† (Shakespeare, p. 19).The foolish king does not understand Cordelia and her love and in this passage, where she sits beside him, nursing him, praying for his health, lamenting the selfishness and cruelty of her sisters, we see the same loyal daughter who refused to bear a grudge for a naà ¯ve, arrogant and narcissistic father who would destroy everything due to his these very follies.There are powerful themes of the play that are duly depicted in this passage. Cordelia’s love for her father, despite the way that he treated her, shows her unrelenting and faithfulness to her father. She feels passionately for her father’s plight and vouches all that she possibly can to the Heavens so that he is well soon. This theme and behavior of Cordelia shows that despite Lear’s pessimism and nihi lism for the world and life in general, no matter how justified his circumstances may be, there is still hope in the world. With people like Cordelia, one could not say the human race is generally bad by nature (Friedlander, n.p.).Some critics also venerate King Lear as a Christian drama with elements of ‘regeneration', ‘redemption' and being ‘saved' (Elton, p. 3). Although the play itself is a tragedy and the cruelty of the bottomless evil of the spirit and nature of mankind is aptly described in the play on various occasions and through various points, but despite all that, through Cordelia’s character and realistic love for her father, we see that mankind is capable of some good, at least.The passage bears in it a strong message for this very fight between good and evil. The world is, although, not as grandly and starkly divided between dark and white forces, this particular passage in King Lear shows that Cordelia has the passion to hate. It is not as if she is a picture of morality or does not understand evil for the reason of being naà ¯ve or un-understanding. She is fully aware of what her sisters had in mind and what they meant to happen to their father. But Cordelia’s true and pure nature helps her ask this question – that even if they had forgotten the fact that Lear was their father – did they not realize that they were doing this to a man who was at the end of his age? A long and war-filled life that needed to be spent in harmony and peace? Yet his own flesh and blood had forsaken him.Due to his senility, he may not have been able to realize the depth of his mistakes and actions – but Cordelia expects from her sisters to understand the senility – and care for him and not swindle him into bringing him into this state of despair and dreadfulness. This passage not only depicts the disappointment and despair of a sister, a daughter and a woebegone character, but the symbol of truth and goodne ss when it faces the turmoil of the chaos that evil and greed have committed in the world, which only produces pain, disaster and tragedy. Bibliography:Elton, William R. King Lear and the Gods. San Marino, Calif: Huntington Library, 1966. Friedlander, Ed. â€Å"Enjoying King Lear, by William Shakespeare†. Pathguy.com. Jan 30, 2005. http://www.pathguy.com/kinglear.htm October 27, 2007. Hamilton, Sharon. Shakespeare's Daughters. Jefferson, N.C.: McFarland, 2003. Hunter, G., and Shakespeare, William. â€Å"King Lear†. London: Penguin Books. 1996. Rosenberg, Marvin. The Masks of King Lear. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1972. Shakespeare, William, Barbara A. Mowat, and Paul Werstine. The Tragedy of King Lear. New Folger Library Shakespeare. New York: Washington Square Press, 2005. King Lear In Shakespeare’s King Lear there is a definite element of the grotesque as seen in Lear’s own personality, and the other main characters in how they treat Lear.   Thus the grotesque in Shakespeare’s play is manifested through power.   The grotesque theme of Shakespeare’s play will be examined in this essay as it pertains to King Lear’s hate of his daughters, and the way in which he treats them before his death.Blindness is a recognition in the play of Lear’s grotesque nature or his need for power over others and how he cannot stand to see the world, or kingdom he created at the end of the play (Friedlander paragraph two).   In King Lear’s distrust of his daughters he one by one makes himself disowned by them as can be deciphered in this speech,I prithee, daughter, do not make me mad. I will not trouble thee, my child; farewell. We'll no more meet, no more see one another. But yet thou art my flesh, my blood, my daughter; Or rathe r a disease that's in my flesh, Which I must needs call mine. Thou art a boil, A plague sore, an embossed carbuncle In my corrupted blood. But I'll not chide thee. Let shame come when it will, I do not call it. I do not bid the Thunder-bearer shoot Nor tell tales of thee to high-judging Jove. Mend when thou canst; be better at thy leisure; I can be patient, I can stay with Regan, I and my hundred knights.† ( Shakespeare II.iv.1514).The parallels of father-child relationships are shown in how Lear’s daughter, Cordelia, parallels to Gloucester’s son Edgar; both Cordelia and Edgar are loyal to their fathers to the end, and Cordelia is banished while Edgar is forced into hiding both actions are pertaining to the manifestation of the grotesque in King Lear (Friedlander paragraph two).   King Lear’s other two daughters, Goneril and Regan, parallel with Gloucester’s son Edmund.   Goneril and Regan flatter Lear, â€Å"Sir, I love you more than words ca n wield the matter† (Shakespeare I. 1. 53-54).The parallels in the deaths of Lear and Gloucester are seen in how both die in the presence of their loyal children; Lear dies with Cordelia in his arms, and Gloucester dies after Edgar has revealed himself as the Duke’s son; thus, although Shakespeare has written the grotesque in the play, he also allows his protagonists a chance of redemption.Moreover, Lear and Gloucester both die in â€Å"extremes of passion.†Ã‚   Lear dies of a broken heart. â€Å"Break heart, I prithee break!†, and Gloucester’s â€Å"flaw’d heart† bursts of â€Å"joy and grief† after his reunion with Edgar (Shakespeare).   As well both die with renewed insight: Gloucester needs to be blinded before he can see Edmund’s deceit and Edgar’s loyalty.   Lear needs to suffer the rejection of his older daughters before he can see Cordelia’s loyalty, and men of power find that the loss of title a nd position humbles them; therefore the grotesque found in King Lear is eventually â€Å"overcome through love† (Doran 141).Shakespeare’s play is based on Briton’s own King Leir, a tragic story of a king and his relationship with his family. The tragic element of the play harkens to the reality of the time of the writing as well as its history involved in Britain (Friedlander paragraph one).   In the quote previously states (â€Å"I prithee daughter†- Shakespeare) there is a strong element of pride, lack of hope, and disease is mentioned.The disease mentioned could be a remark on the overpowering plagues occurring in Britain as well as famine.   Thus, the stress in a family relationship would be counted more stressful because of the environmental factors involved in the play’s setting.   In fact, the theme of hunger, either of love, hope, pride, or greed, runs strong through the entire play, and this is the reason the first quote is so import ant, it highlights these human elements in the play (West 57).Although the theme of marriage is not as   strong in this play there are other themes which comprise the progression of the plot.   The theme in King Lear subsists with the child-parent relationship which further develops with Lear’s three daughters, their submissiveness or lack of submissiveness with their father.   In this play the focus of the married daughters who are proven to be evil and usurpers of their fathers power while the younger daughter, the innocent unmarried one proves to be the only supporter King Lear has although he blindingly distrusts her from act one.   The theme of King Lear is suitably that of loyalty from the female caste whether in faithfulness or disloyalty.The parallels of greed in political power (another form of the grotesque in Shakespeare’s play) are presented in how Goneril and Regan seek political power by their ability to strip the King of all his train of follower s, by rejecting the King’s title, and turning him out into the storm, â€Å"†¦entreat him by no means to stay† (Shakespeare III. 1. 297).   Also, Edmund has high political aspirations by allowing Gloucester to be blinded for his own political gain,   â€Å"Hang him instantly [Regan]†¦Pluck out his eyes [Goneril]† (Shakespeare III. 7. 4-5), and he usurps Edgar’s legitimate title as the future Earl of Gloucester.   Furthermore, Kent and Edgar both lose their nobility, the Earl of Kent is banished for his honest defense of Cordelia, and Edgar loses his claim to nobility through the deceit and trickery of Edmund.The combination between the sub-plot and the main-plot in King Lear comprises of thematically similar plots. Shakespeare has used the characters and themes of the subplot to amplify the drama and calamity of the main plot.   With two plots, perfectly intertwined and yet offering parallel lessons, Shakespeare is able to heighten the e motional effect of the tragedy.   In conclusion, the subplot intensifies the emotional impact of the main plot in the areas of child-parent relationships, the corruption of political power, and the death of the protagonist (West 58).In the perception of identity and love in that identity King Lear is redemptive but full of blame, and still hanging onto pride which presents the issue of love for a woman, albeit a daughter, has not persuasion over self-loathing (Doran 152).   Here Shakespeare’s design in the play portends of how innocence as with Cordelia when followed is prophetic but when love is denied in Shakespeare’s plays the consequences are dire.   In King Lear’s age he sees himself as beyond the measure of blame because his life is already lived, his deeds are already accomplished. It is with the hope of redemption through love that the play ends; King Lear states,Hear me, recreant! On thine allegiance, hear me! Since thou hast sought to make us bre ak our vow- Which we durst never yet- and with strain'd pride To come between our sentence and our power,- Which nor our nature nor our place can bear,- Our potency made good, take thy reward. Five days we do allot thee for provision To shield thee from diseases of the world, And on the sixth to turn thy hated back Upon our kingdom. If, on the tenth day following, Thy banish'd trunk be found in our dominions, The moment is thy death. Away! By Jupiter, This shall not be revok'd   (ShakespeareI.i.178ff).It is only with the hope of love, that these characters can be redeemed, and the nature of the grotesque in the play may be wiped out.This essay has delved into the plays inner workings of plot, and sub plot and how each character seems to represent a certain element of the grotesque in human nature through greed, political power, and lack of faith (West 57).   It is only through King Lear’s blindness that this grotesque nature is truly seen since the reason for his blindnes s is because he cannot bear to see the world he created through his own grotesque nature beginning with doubt of his daughter’s love.Work CitedDoran, M.   The Quarto of â€Å"King Lear† and Bright's Shorthand.   Modern Philology,  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   Vol.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   33, No. 2 (Nov., 1935), pp. 139-157Friedlander, E.   Enjoying King Lear.   2005.   Online.   Retrieved 22 November 2007.http://www.pathguy.com/kinglear.htmShakespeare.   King Lear.   Penguin Classic.   1998.Theatre History.   King Lear.   2002.   Online.   Retrieved 22 November 2007.http://www.theatrehistory.com/british/kinglear001.htmlWest, R.   Sex and Pessimism in King Lear.   Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 11, No. 1.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚   (Winter, 1960), pp. 55-60. King Lear PPISMP TESL (R) Foundation Course Cohort 4 (June 2011 Intake) English Studies III: PI 1353K (R) (Revision) KING LEAR By William Shakespeare 1. The intricate relationship between characters adds to the interest of readers to study the play. Based on the play you have studied, discuss this statement with convincing evidence to justify your answer. 2. Write a critical analysis of one of the themes presented in the play you have studied. 3. Identify the theme of the play you have studied. Elaborate how the theme is developed by the characters. . Identify the theme of the play you have studied. Elaborate how the plot and the setting develop the theme. 5. Identify one of the issues raised in the play you have studied. characters reflect this issue. Elaborate how the 6. Identify the theme of the play you have studied. Elaborate how the theme is developed by the setting and the characters. 7. Identify the issues raised in the play you have studied. evidence from the text. Discuss the issues with 8. Discuss the significance of the title and how it reflects the theme of the play. .Discuss the significance of the title and how it is developed by the characters and plot of the novel. NHA/ES III – King Lear Revision/2012 Themes Greed for power & wealth Betrayal Familial relationship Love & betrayal Issues Greed for power & wealth destroys Blind love Actions and consequences 10. Based on the drama you have studied, analyze the play based on the following i. The characters ii. The theme iii. The issues raised Support your answer with convincing evidence and elaboration. 1. You have studied a play during this course. Based on this play, write a critical analysis of about 350 words. In your analysis, discuss the themes and issues raised and how these are portrayed by the characters. 12. Write a reader response of about 350 words on the play you have studied. In your reader response, discuss the following; i. ii. iii. The theme The characters and their relationships The i nfluence of the setting on the characters NHA/ES III – King Lear Revision/2012 King Lear Although a similar vision of justice is encompassed within King Lear and The Tempest, both protagonists receive fate strikingly dissimilar from one another; as a direct result of the relationship shared between their respective daughters, which ultimately distinguishes the plays from the similar concepts (compassion, nature, monarchy, and usurping) found within them. In King Lear, the nature of mercy and redemption are unobtainable elements, as the form of a Shakespearean tragedy is established on the foundation of chaos and pity, which arguably conceals the subtle (or blatant) relationship between both plays.Both plays include a tempest; a violent thunderstorm that symbolize a life-changing moment for the introspective protagonists. Prospered magic conjures the violent storm described in The Tempest, which destroys the boat of his royal enemies and prompts the pilot of the play. Unlike Prosper, Lear is a victim of the tempest described in his tragedy, but Shakespeare purposely uses this scene to ‘ cleanse' the drenched king as he makes a revelation through an emotional soliloquy, thus humbugging him.This concept of nature's fury, although mutually significant in both respective plays, also discloses the dissimilarity shared between the two protagonists. Prosper, from the opening scene, was described as wise and empathetic, specifically using the storm to confront his enemies, not to cause harm. Prosper was already introduced to the audience as a humankind protagonist, while Shakespeare depicted Lear as ‘blind' until his own tempest in the middle of the play. The significance of the tempest scenes symbolizes the genesis of repentance and retribution for both of the principal characters.Although Prosper is successful in restoring his role as the rightful king in the plays climax, Learner's kingdom is obliterated and results in his death. The notable nature behind the protagonist's paternal role towards their daughter tryingly influences the events of the play, as both elderly kings are fathers to similarly angelic daughters. In King Lear, the audience is quickly clued in on Learner's foolishness as a father, since Shakespeare manifests this notion through the old kings retirement celebration.Learner's two daughters, General and Reagan, are wicked women who manipulatively express their faux affection towards their narcissistic father. Ironically, Cornelia remains the only daughter of virtue who proclaims that the sincere affection she feels towards him transcends mere words. King Learner's opening CT alone already corresponds with the introduction found within The Tempest's introduction, except the scenario is presented in a reverse manner.Lear was seeking an early retirement and attempted to distribute his kingdom between his three daughters, while Prosper was usurped of his dukedom by his treacherous younger brother, Antonio. Despite of the similarities presented in the opening act, Shakespeare also reveals the pivotal differe nce behind the plays father/daughter dynamic. Unlike Lear, Prosper is completely engrossed in Miranda and her well- being from the plays opening, even comparing her too cherub: MIRANDA Alack, what trouble Was I then to you! PROSPER O, a cherubim Thou waste that did preserve me.Thou didst smile. Infused with a fortitude from heaven. (1. 2. 51-54) Shakespeare arguably uses Miranda for the sole purpose of symbolism, since her character's actions are essentially irrelevant to the events in The Tempest, as she's utilized more as an image of Prospered fatherly love rather than a character of great significance. Cornelia, whose nature is undeniably similar to Miranda, is portrayed as one the most compelling characters in King Lear, due to her role as the angelic daughter who substitutes Marinara's naivety with awareness.Shakespeare exchanges the protagonist's role through their daughters in both King Lear and The Tempest; Lear exhibits Marinara's naivety and Prosper reflects Cordillera's c ompassion. Shakespeare distinguishes this concept from the onset of both plays and hints towards the protagonist's fate through, once again, their daughters. Prosper established his endearment towards Miranda in the beginning of The Tempest and consistently demonstrated his loyalty towards her. Shakespeare rewards the unconditional love exhibited by the elderly king and compensates the former ruler with a favorable conclusion.In King Lear, the protagonist is not bestowed with the same fortune, as Lear also hints towards his fate during the plays introduction. Lear does not refer to his celestial daughter a cherub, like Prosper did, and chooses to disown his daughter instead: LEAR: Let it be so. Thy truth then be thy dower. For by the sacred radiance of the sun, The mysteries of Hectare and the night, By all the operation of the orbs From whom we do exist and cease to be-? Here I disclaim all my paternal care, Propinquity, and property of blood, And as a stranger to my heart and me H old thee from this for ever.The barbarous Scythian, Or he that makes his generation messes To gorge his appetite, shall to my bosom Be as well neighborhood, pitied, and relieved As thou my sometime daughter. (109-123) Truthfully, Lear only disowned his daughter through the sole notion that she didn't love him (verbally), but the motive behind this harsh act does not exempt Lear from the grim fate Shakespeare had reserved. A Shakespearean tragedy is molded on the tragic figure's hamster, as Learner's foolishness' was evidently his.Betrayal of kin spreads like poison throughout King Learner's conclusion: Gloucester, Lear, Reagan, and General all meet their grim fate because of the deception they inflicted on their families. Cornelia is substantially the most tragic character in King Lear (and arguably all of the tragedies) due to her innocent and compassionate persona, which rejects the bitterness imposed from being the victim of betrayal and attempts to restore her father's usurped t itle.However, the unspeakable act behind a father abandoning his saintly daughter strongly indicates why Shakespeare bestowed Prosper with magic and Lear with madness. Superficially, King Lear and The Tempest both provide many of the elements squired in a revenge plot. Both protagonists are conceptually banished after their royal power is renounced, regardless if the title was robbed from them or relinquished willingly, and desire to restore their former glory. The plays also describe similar scenes of madness experienced by Lear but inflicted by Prosper on secondary characters.Although betrayal and the search for Justice are elements fundamental to the plays plot, neither story qualifies in taking the title of a revenge tragedy. In King Lear, the only character that arguably has a motive for revenge is Edmund for being mocked as an illegitimate child. Lear, the principal character, is responsible for triggering the events of the play by allowing the wicked sisters to rule his kingd om and disown Cornelia. In The Tempest, the magical harpy generated by Prospered magic doesn't qualify as the Vengeful ghost' most revenge tragedies would describe.Prosper succeeds in his revenge by restoring his stolen title from Antonio, but expresses mercy and compassion towards his enemies, therefore voiding the play from any tragic genre. Predominantly, the themes illustrated in The Tempest and King Lear project the once for Justice, but the concept behind familial betrayal stem from the protagonist's daughters and ultimately receive Judgment from Shakespeare. The component of evil is not entirely absent from The Tempest, as Clinical (the son of the Devil who attempted to rape young Miranda) is undeniably a wicked character.Clinical echoes similarities to Lagos character in Othello, evoking the idea that the Devil mightier had more children scattered throughout the Shakespearean universe. While the Journey for restoration described in King Lear arguably parallels the plot thin The Tempest, the progress actually made by protagonists reveals that the psyche of both men are actually years apart. Prosper is already enjoying the relationship he shares with his daughter at the beginning of his play while Lear doesn't make his revelation until half of the plays events elapse.In fact, Lear is ironically more sane as a madman then he ever was as king. Shakespeare gives the notion that the power behind father-daughter relationship transcends any obstacle hurled towards the protagonist, as described by the victory Prosper achieved after Ewing exiled to a distant island, but the tragedy depicted in King Lear reminds the audience of the grim consequences one must face when turning their back on innocent family. The conclusion of both plays, Just like their introductions, are described in a reverse fashion.Shakespeare temporarily forgave Lear through compassionate Cornelia, while Prosper exhibited his compassion by forgiving the other characters. Prosper learns compass ion through Miranda, a concept that Shakespeare deliberately instilled in Lear when it was too late . If Shakespeare had altered the conclusion in King Lear to an ending where Lear survived the chaos, then t would be plausible to assume his character would exhibit the same characteristics of Prosper; two elderly rulers who where once usurped by malicious family and learned the value of compassion through their righteous daughters.Of course, this theoretical concept of King Lear concluding in peace would null the play from its tragic form, and reclassify the drama as a comedy Just like it's companion play, The Tempest. Moreover, The elements of a tragedy illustrated in The Tempest are not as blatant as those described in King Lear, if anything, the hamster Lear suffers from is substituted by Prospered wisdom. The element of hope, however, is a strong tragic component that pulsates throughout the veins of both plays. The audience evidently sympathizes with both protagonists, as both e lderly men have been â€Å"more sinned against than sinning. (3. 2. 1372), but Shakespeare ultimately scrutinizes the elderly men through their behavior as fathers-of-celestial women and Judges their fate by either condemning the protagonist to an agonizing death or rewarding him with the honor of restored monarchy and freedom. *Addendum: If given the fortunate opportunity to celebrate my 65th birthday, Judging by how I fleet on life the past 24 years, I can certainly see myself remembering Shakespearean work as the key to understanding hamster and the very-real danger it can demonstrate.Aristotle coined the term hamster, but it wasn't until I read Shakespearean Hamlet that I realized the consequences of your internal-flaws. Similar to Hamlet, I used to have an indecisive personality, (which hasn't completely faded from my subconscious), and I frequently would think-before acting and find faux justifications in delaying my goals: applying for scholarships, working harder in grade s chool, daily exercise, healthy dieting, and managing finances.Although I didn't interact with the ghost of my father nor seek revenge against my treacherous uncle, I lost dozens of life-enriching opportunities due to being indecisive and it haunts me frequently. I can only assume, and hope, that the age of 65 will be a milestone for decades of utilizing a revamped proactive persona, as the tragedies will always remind me of the catastrophes that stem from personality flaws. After all, what better way can we pity a tragic figure than to express our own compassion towards their suffering?

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Essay about sociology and the family - 1732 Words

You will refer to statistical evidence when discussing the variety of family and household types. You will be required to reference your work throughout and produce a correct and current bibliography to demonstrate that you have used different sources to obtain your information. Sociology and the Family The Nuclear Family generally consists of a Mother, a Father and at least 1 child, this image of a family is thought to of come about at the time of the Industrial Revolution. (Willmott and Young) believe that an increase in the Nuclear Family was the result of the Industrialization. They found that during pre-industrial times, the most common type of family structure, was that of the Extended Family (Extended Family can take†¦show more content†¦Martin (2012) explains that British children are among the least likely to live with both Biological Parents by the time they reach age 14, statistics show that in Britain this is just 68.9%, whilst the same statistics in France are 79.5% and Finland at the highest with 95.2%. Changes in the different Family types will be outlined with evidence in the following pages showing Evidence and Statistics. Browne (2008) tells us that whilst Marriage is the usual type of relationship between Men and Women, Marriages where it’s the first time for both partners, is on a high scale decline, numbers have at least halved since 1970. This means that there are now more Reconstituted Families (families where at least one spouse will have children from a previous relationship), also knows as Step-Families. This is the fastest growing family type as now nearly half of Marriages involve a second marriage for at least one of the partners, reflecting an increase in Divorce Rates. The most recent studies show that 42% of Marriages now end in Divorce and that they are on the increase, although recent statistics contradict this fact, as they show that Divorce Rates are decreasing each year. In 2011, there were 117,588 divorces, compared to 121,779 in 2008, and a staggering 153,176 in 2003, a decrease of 30% in 8 years (ONS, 2008-2011) South African divorce rates are also decreasing, between 2005 and 2011, the numbers fell, from 32,484 to 20,980, a difference of 55% (SSA).Show MoreRelatedSociology Of The Family Class947 Words   |  4 Pages This Sociology of the Family class has been an eye-opening experience. My views of the United States have been impacted by an objective comparison of their policies to those of other nations. 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There are many different types of feminists; the main ones are Radical feminists, Marxist feminist and liberal feminists. Although they are categorised separately, they fundamentally believe in the same idea, which is the dominant functionalist assumptions are inaccurate and should therefore be challenged. Functionali sts believe that in the family, the role of the woman is functionalRead MoreApplied Sociology Within the Family Essay1165 Words   |  5 PagesApplied Sociology within the Family Applied sociology is a part of everyday life. Families experience sociological changes when parents get divorced, a new job is taken, or they get discriminated against. Most people may not think of family as a small society, micro level society, within itself. All families have a hierarchy of power beginning with the head of the household which tends to be the father. The way a family forms its own small society is interesting. Family roles have change dramaticallyRead MoreSociology - Child Centredness in Contemporary Families1483 Words   |  6 PagesEvaluate the view that contemporary families have become more child centred Firstly , child centred society is where children have become more valued and therefore focused on and protected. In this essay I will be evaluating the view that modern families have become more child centred. I will do this by including childhood in the past compared to childhood now , and how childhood has improved through rights and economic improvements and so on. Firstly , childhood is a phase of life between infancyRead MoreUnit 4 Sociology - The Weakening of the Family Structure893 Words   |  4 Pages The Weakening of the Family Structure Tenisha Greene American InterContinental Online Abstract Many expert sociologists have alluded to a weakening of the family structure of the years. In an effort to determine if their findings are true, the factors that influence the deterioration have to be examined. Such factors as unemployment, welfare, and the entertainment industry play a major role in the weakening families. â€Å"For if the family is becoming less viable economicallyRead MoreDescribe Ways in Which Concept of Family Has Changed Across Cultures and over Time (Sociology)1442 Words   |  6 PagesDESCRIBE WAYS IN WHICH CONCEPT OF FAMILY HAS CHANGED ACROSS CULTURES AND OVER TIME Families in the world are very different. They come in different shapes and sizes, it can be based on different kinds of relationship, but what all families have in common that it is made of people you love and care. Over past 20 or more years families in the world has changed the most than it has changed in all history. Of course changes in the families are different among cultures and religions. It seems that United

Saturday, December 28, 2019

Quasi-Experimental Designs Essay - 702 Words

Quasi-Experimental Designs Milagros V. Mercado Walden University PSYC-3003-12 Methods in Psychological Inquiry Instructor: Meredith McKee 09/28/2011 Quasi-Experimental Designs According to (Stangor, 2011. pp. 274), quasi-experimental design is employed when there are two groups of people that cannot be assigned randomly to other groups. Also, in this type of design the variables cannot be manipulated as they would be in other types of experiments and the variables are measured rather than manipulated, (pp.274). In this case, there are four different studies that are important to assess as to their variables and how they would work. The first study that I chose is study one that demonstrates that women perform more poorly, on†¦show more content†¦In addition, the intended outcome would be that women would perform higher on the mathematics section after they had the tutoring. Boyd (2002), states that this would not be a true comparison group because the research participants are being compared against themselves. However, this would be in addition to the first experiment. Furthermore, the second study I chose study two because it demonstrates that lower-socioeconomic-status students benefit more over time from an academic tutoring program than do higher socioeconomic-status students. I would think this would also be true and would like to know more information on this one. The independent variable is the socioeconomic status of the students. The dependent variable is the tutoring program and its effect on performance. Another alternative research design that could be used to gain more information in this study would be a case study design. In this study, an individual could be chosen to research that was in this particular study. The purpose of the case study would be to understand the environment in which the individual grew up and how it has affected their ability to learn. The case study may provide insight into how lower-socioeconomic-status hinders the individual and perhaps why the academic tutoring program is successful.Show MoreRelatedEssay on Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs679 Words   |  3 PagesExperimental designs Experimental designs are viewed as the most accurate, and most demanding of research designs, requiring strict attention to rules and procedures. Researchers use these research designs to manipulate and control testing procedures as a way to understand a cause and effect relationship. Commonly, independent variables are manipulated to judge or decide their effect on a dependent variable (Trochim Donnelly, 2008). In order for an experiment to be considered aRead MoreDifference Between True Experimental Design And Quasi Experimental Research Design1064 Words   |  5 Pages Explain the difference between true experimental design and quasi-experimental research design. Provide examples. Quasi-experimental research designs and experimental research designs both have one aim, which is to test a casual hypothesis (UNICEF, 2014). A true experiment can be defined as testing a hypothesis with randomly assigned groups, where as a quasi experiment can not, so it is simply an experiment that isn’t a true experiment (Kowalczyk, 2015) The main difference stems from the randomisationRead MoreExperimental And Quasi Experimental Research Design1582 Words   |  7 Pages Research Configuration: Research design can be categorized into two sections including experimental and quasi-experimental research design ((Soy, 2015). In an experimental research design, the researcher needs to assign the subjects based on random selection. The subjects are assigned to particular groups for a different level of treatment. On the other hand, the quasi-experiment design suggests a process where the researcher avoids randomization, as the subjects are not selected randomly. TheRead MoreCorrative Research Design And Quasi-Experimental Design1316 Words   |  6 Pages The strategy behind this design is that with the quasi- experimental design and the use of a longitudinal design there would be a better collection of data because it would provide an idea of when bad parenting affects the child and the child starts acting in a delinquent manner, and also it would show if the delinquency follows to their early/ late teen years in high school. For the purpose of this study, the group of individuals being studied would be the children that have turned delinquentRead MoreExamination of Delphi and Quasi-experimental Research Designs1708 Words   |  7 Pagessolutions for known problems. The Delphi and quasi-experimental studies provide examples of research performed in library science. The Delphi Study The Delphi study was developed by The RAND Corporation in the 1950s for the Air Force and was primarily used to forecast future events based on expert opinions (Wildemuth, 2009). Delphi studies provide an alternative to the traditional round-table type discussion (Cypher Gant, 1971). The Delphi design depends on three components: anonymity, controlledRead MoreDifference Between True Experimental And Quasi Experimental Research Design1070 Words   |  5 Pagesbetween true experimental and quasi-experimental research design. Provide examples in your answer. (265 words) True experimental and quasi-experimental research designs are the two most common forms of research design. While they both share similar elements, such as measuring participant results to test the hypothesis, there are also significant differences between true experimental and quasi-experimental research designs (The Regents of the University of Michigan, 2013 ). True experimental researchRead MoreDifference Between True Experimental And Quasi Experimental Research Design Essay1169 Words   |  5 PagesPSY201 ~ Assignment 2: Short Answer Quiz Question 1 Explain the difference between true experimental and quasi-experimental research design. Provide examples in your answer. (285 words) True experimental and quasi-experimental research designs are the two most commonly used types of research design. They share some common characteristics such as measuring collected data to test the hypothesis, although, overall there are many differences between the two, especially in regards to the type of researchRead MoreDesign: A Quasi Experimental Design (Study/Control) Was1406 Words   |  6 PagesDesign: A quasi experimental design (study/control) was utilized to examine the effect of using risk reduction intervention to reduce risk of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture. Setting: The study was conducted at the outpatient clinics in Menoufia University Hospital, at Shebin El-Kom City, Menuofia Governorate. The University Hospitals was selected because of the considerable number of people at high-risk for osteoporosis attending to these outpatient clinics (1500) patients every month. AlsoRead MoreA Research Study Uses A Pretest / Posttest Quasi Experimental Design807 Words   |  4 PagesMethodology Research Design The research study uses a pretest/posttest quasi-experimental design to determine if anger management group work with court-mandated Domestic Violence Offenders (DVO) decreases aggressive symptoms and domestic violence recidivism rates. This data is collected from the Center of Children and Family Services in Hampton, Virginia using the Domestic Violence Inventory (DVI). The offenders will complete a DVI pretest, receive the group intervention, and then complete a DVIRead MoreQuasi-Experimental Group Design To Compare Recidivism Rates Of Opioid Offenders?892 Words   |  4 PagesMethods Research Design The current study will utilize a quasi-experimental group design to compare recidivism rates of opioid offenders in drug courts compared to offenders on probation. Since, random assignment to control and experimental groups are not feasible, the two groups will be matched on various demographic characteristics as well as the current choice of drug. The data will be collected on all participants that have entered the Brooklyn Treatment Court, NY (BTC) in the second judicial

Friday, December 20, 2019

Frankenstein - 1237 Words

Literature: Frankenstein Essay Frankenstein is a gothic horror novel that was written by Mary Shelly and was published in 1818, when gothic aesthetic, romanticism and science were beginning to spike in western culture. The novel follows the story of Victor Frankenstein in creating a monster which causes destruction around him, as Victor had ambition and thirst to reveal the secrets of nature. The novel could be viewed as a warning to the readers and audience about having a greed for knowledge and power. Mary Shelley explores the idea of having obtained too much knowledge and curiosity and playing god which involves consequences and dangers that come with it throughout the text. It also compares the human development of emotions and has†¦show more content†¦Robert discontinued his journey of discoveries, taking into account Victor’s advice and emotions that saved Robert from generating his own misery, guilt and regrets. There is a difference referencing creation through the biblical story of Adam and Eve, Victor rejected his creation and then the monster starts to tell his side of his story. By doing this, it positions the readers to feel sympathy for the monster. â€Å"Remember, that I am thy creature: I ought to be thy Adam† – page 66, the creature makes the connections and reference between his creator, Victor and God, himself and Adam. â€Å"Like Adam, I was created apparently united by no link to any other being in existence but his state was far from different from mine in every other respect†. In the biblical tale of Adam and Eve, Adam was cared for and had experienced a happy existence compared to the creature, unlike the monster that was neglected by his own creation and lived in total despair and anger. This powered the monster to be destructive and to swear by to seek revenge on his creator, unlike Adam and Eve, they did not. The difference between Adam and the creation is that, the companionship that is present in Adam and the absent companionship in Frankenstein with the monster. Adam’s creator created Eve as his companion, while Victor did not create a companion for the monster, therefore leaving him feeling lonely and miserable. â€Å"You must create a female for me, with whom I can live in the interchange ofShow MoreRelatedFrankenstein, By Victor Frankenstein988 Words   |  4 PagesLane Johnson Mr. Jones English 12 Honors/4th Period March 15, 2015 Victor Frankenstein and his creation surprisingly share many of the same characteristics. Even though Frankenstein is an ugly, unwanted creature, he and Victor withhold an obvious connection throughout the novel. However, Victor and Frankenstein also share their differences as well. Victor was raised in a very caring and loving home. His parents gave Victor everything he wanted and Victor grew up with great friends. Victor’s parentsRead MoreFrankenstein And Frankenstein Essay1474 Words   |  6 Pagesfictional characters, most famously in John Milton’s Paradise Lost, in 1667, and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, in 1818. The complexity of the characters in these texts creates the theme of nature versus nurture before they diverge and arrive at differing conclusions. Many critics arose over the years to contest the main character of Milton’s epic. Shelley, arguably Milton’s greatest critic, wrote Frankenstein to contrast her views on the conflict between creator and creation. She also uses an unconventionalRead MoreFrankenstein1112 Words   |  5 Pagesas a reflection of context. The capacity of thematic concerns to transcend time are manifested within Mary Shelley s 19th century gothic novel Frankenstein (1818) and Ridley Scott s dystopian science fiction film Blade Runner (1992) as both pose markedly similar existentialist discourses regarding the fate of humanity. Through Frankenstein , Shelley s romantic approach condemns humanity s intrusive assumption as creator during an era where scientific hubris prompted people to abandonRead MoreFrankenstein1009 Words   |  5 PagesMary Shelly’s Frankenstein seems to be an exact representation of the ideas of the 17th century philosopher John Locke. In Locke’s  "An Essay Concerning Human Understanding,† he talks about the idea that we as humans are all born with a ‘blank slate’ that contains no knowledge whatsoever and that we can only know that things exist if we first experience them through sensation and reflection. In Frankenstein, the monster portrays Locke’s ideas of gaining knowledge perfectly through worldly experienceRead MoreFrankenstein: Technology1728 Words   |  7 PagesFrankenstein: Technology In Frankenstein or The Modern Prometheus, written in the late nineteenth century by Mary Shelley, Shelley proposes that knowledge and its effects can be dangerous to individuals and all of humanity. Frankenstein was one of our first and still is one of our best cautionary tales about scientific research.. Shelleys novel is a metaphor of the problems technology is causing today. Learn from me. . . at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledgeRead MoreFrankenstein Critique866 Words   |  4 PagesAs Mary Shelley wrote Frankenstein, she poured much time into portraying her characters and making them believable and life-like. Her scenes are painted with beautiful, descriptive words that are colored with vivid emotions and applicable morals. Her life experiences were strategically placed in her writing to convey a sense of reality and completion of plots and subplots. Her experience with failed love ties in with the emotion that she expresses the loneliness of Frankenstein’s creation. She developsRead MoreCharacters in Frankenstein1261 Words   |  6 PagescenterbExamine the way in which characters are portrayed in the novel./b/center br brIn the novel Frankenstein, written by Mary Shelley, the characters have been portrayed effectively. Much of the interactions between characters, and characteristics of the characters have been based on events which have occurred in Shelley s own life, or th ey represent what she believes is important. For example, Victor is portrayed as having a strong passion for science, and a poor understanding ofRead MoreFrankenstein : The Way Frankenstein, And His Creation1275 Words   |  6 Pagesprevalent in Shelly’s novel is the way Frankenstein, and his creation, are controlled by their emotions. Frankenstein is continually ruled by his feelings of fear, guilt, and love throughout the novel. For instance, he works for nearly two years to accomplish his goal of creating life, only to immediately flee because of fear when his work comes to life. This was a major illustration for the reader that despite being an experienced scientist Frankenstein was still ruled by emotions. In a largeRead More Mary Shelleys Frankenstein - Victor Frankenstein is to Blame1046 Words   |  5 PagesVictor Frankenstein is to Blame Can an intense appetency for the pursuit of knowledge result in fatal consequences? In most situations when a strong desire is present consequences are seldom taken into consideration. In the novel, Frankenstein, Victor Frankenstein pursues knowledge in an obsessive manner that blinds him to the possible effects. Victor Frankenstein is the primary cause of his creatures desolation. Indeed, Victor Frankenstein is at fault for the creatures isolation andRead More Victor Frankenstein is the Monster in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein566 Words   |  3 PagesVictor Frankenstein is the Monster in Mary Shelleys Frankenstein   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Through out the novel we are under the assumption that the demon in the novel is the man who is disfigured and hideous on the outside. While we view Victor Frankenstein as the handsome and caring victim, even though sometimes a monster cannot be seen but heard. Looks can be deceiving but actions are always true.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  We first view Frankenstein’s ignorance while he is busy in his work. He had not visited his family for